Project Summaries

10-661MO  Project Manager: E. M. Barnes

USING REAL-TIME SENSORS TO DIFFERENTIATE BETWEEN NITROGEN AND WATER STRESS IN COTTON

Andrea Phillips Jones, David Dunn, Gene Stevens, University of Missouri and Earl Vories, USDA-ARS

The ability to sense the nitrogen status of crops is an important component of precision agriculture, allowing more precise estimates of the additional amount needed to complete the growing season. Systems have been demonstrated on several crops including wheat, corn, and cotton. Many of these systems are based on the reflectance of the crop canopy; however, drought stress can influence both the color and orientation of leaves and, thereby, affect reflectance. Much Mid-South cotton is produced without irrigation, but even irrigated cotton can be impacted when irrigation is delayed, which commonly occurs to facilitate other cultural practices. This report shows the results of a three year study with 22 nitrogen treatments in furrow irrigated and rain fed plots. Sensors for canopy reflectance, temperature, and height were driven through the plots twice each year. The objective of this project is to improve the ability to determine nitrogen status in season.

 

Project Year: 2012
 

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